Wayfinding is more than signage - using other visual clues

Wayfinding around complex buildings and spaces is a difficult task.  The main tactic is usually static signage.  However this has problems in the volume of information that can be presented and more importantly absorbed and understood by the user.  To deal with this we are seeing more interesting ways to convey wayfinding information - here are some examples that we've come across recently

Firstly, is Wayfinder Wallpaper created by Mike&Maaike for rollout.  An essentially decorative finish that attempts to embed wayfinding information in the visual.



The second example is the design for the Eureka Tower Car Park in Melbourne by Axel Peemoeller.   This uses distorted lettering on the walls which when viewed from the right angle give a strong message. 





Finally, a signage and wayfinding approach from Ralston & Bau for the Storehagen Atrim in Norway.  This borrows heavily from railway/metro maps and signage to provide wayfinding in an office building.  This provides a common visual linkage throughout the building. 





So there many other visual ways in which users can be helped to navigate spaces and these can integrate well into the interior design.  We can't be sure how well any of these examples or other similar designs work but we found them thought-provoking  in at least thinking of other ways to help people make sense of a space.

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DESIGN AND THE HUMAN FACTOR: Wayfinding is more than signage - using other visual clues

Monday, 15 November 2010

Wayfinding is more than signage - using other visual clues

Wayfinding around complex buildings and spaces is a difficult task.  The main tactic is usually static signage.  However this has problems in the volume of information that can be presented and more importantly absorbed and understood by the user.  To deal with this we are seeing more interesting ways to convey wayfinding information - here are some examples that we've come across recently

Firstly, is Wayfinder Wallpaper created by Mike&Maaike for rollout.  An essentially decorative finish that attempts to embed wayfinding information in the visual.



The second example is the design for the Eureka Tower Car Park in Melbourne by Axel Peemoeller.   This uses distorted lettering on the walls which when viewed from the right angle give a strong message. 





Finally, a signage and wayfinding approach from Ralston & Bau for the Storehagen Atrim in Norway.  This borrows heavily from railway/metro maps and signage to provide wayfinding in an office building.  This provides a common visual linkage throughout the building. 





So there many other visual ways in which users can be helped to navigate spaces and these can integrate well into the interior design.  We can't be sure how well any of these examples or other similar designs work but we found them thought-provoking  in at least thinking of other ways to help people make sense of a space.

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5 Comments:

Blogger Jenny Sayre said...

Thank you. These are very interesting examples. I really like how all these examples are trying to find a visual vocabulary that people can read to find their way. One question--if the Eureka car park signage only really works when you are pointed the right direction, how do the people who are lost find their way?

29 November 2010 at 20:21  
Anonymous David Watts said...

Jenny, thanks for the comment. Interesting point about the car park signage - we had wondered the same. I guess the signs are designed to be viewed from the car and therefore the position of a car is more predictable (ie in the lanes) so it may work.

30 November 2010 at 11:48  
Anonymous Joyce Miller said...

I really enjoyed looking at the photos from the Eureka Tower Car Park in Melbourne by Axel Peemoeller. This design is amazing and would love to see it one day.

Joyce

11 January 2011 at 22:49  
Anonymous camille said...

Wow, these pictures are amazing. Wayfinding can definitely be considered an art now. Poblocki Sign Company does some very creative signage as well. Who know .there were so many different ways to use wayfinding

26 January 2011 at 19:21  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the car-park example is awesome, however, I would have chosen a different color for the down. When you look at the photo that shows "Down" in it's distorted perspective, it takes on the form of caution/don't drive here lines. In America, possibly in other parts of the world, driving over the yellow lines like that is not allowed. People coming down the ramp may freeze in caution and hesitate - which could cause some damage.

27 January 2011 at 02:36  

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